Crito by plato socrates argument

Table of Contents Summary The dialogue takes place in Socrates' prison cell, where he awaits execution.

Crito by plato socrates argument

For a suitable donation, a question could be put to the Pythia and an answer obtained from Apollo. Since the words of the Pythia were hard to understand, the priests attending her wrote up the answer in verse and delivered it to the petitioner.

The answers were legendarily obscure or ambiguous -- the source of the modern of meaning of "oracular," which is precisely to be obscure or ambiguous. One example of the kinds of answers Delphi gave occurred when King Croesus of Lydiaof legendary wealth, sought advice on the attack against Persia he was contemplating.

Cyrus the Great had just overthrown the Medesinand Croesus figured that this must reveal the weakness of the Median state, and that, in any case, Cyrus' new realm was bound to be disorganized for a while, giving the Lydians an opportunity to renew the war that had ended in But he was a cautious ruler, and sent a question to Delphi, asking what would happen if he attacked the Persians.

This is a revealing episode, since Croesus wasn't even a Greek. Delphi already had such a reputation. The answer that the Pythia delivered was that if Croesus attacked Cyrus, "a great kingdom will fall. He had no idea who he was dealing with, and was defeated very swiftly indeed. Lydia became part of Persia in But Cyrus didn't kill, torture, or imprison Croesus.

The former king was sent home to live in retirement, where he had the leisure to write back to Delphi and complain that he had been misled.

The priests answered his letter, telling him that what they had said was perfectly accurate. A great kingdom had indeed fallen, namely his.

Croesus might have worried which kingdom the god had referred to. Another example came when the Persians invaded Greece in King Xerxes wished to avenge the defeat of his father, Darius, at the battle of Marathon in I had a student once who worked at the "Phidippides Sports Center," a sports supply store in Encino, California.

This was named after the messenger who is supposed to have run back to Athens to report the defeat of the Persians. Unfortunately, Phidippides dropped dead once he had blurted out, "Victory is ours.

The distance of a Marathon run is As it happens, the distance from Marathon to Athens is more like 19 miles 30 km.Analysis of Plato's Crito. The life of Socrates provides one example of a someone who seeks a justification for his or her moral actions.

Socrates tries to use REASON (rather than the values embedded in his culture) to determine whether an action is right or wrong. Socrates quickly dismisses 1, 3, and 4 as irrelevant (though, at the end of the dialogue, he revisits #4.) III.

The opinion of the Many and the Experts. One of Crito’s argument that he and Socrates’ friends in general would appear in a bad light if they did not help Socrates.

In both Plato’s Apology and Crito, Plato presents Socrates arguments clearly and precisely. Socrates is wise man with a different perspective on life, which presents us with a mass of contradictions. Point out to students that, in some sense, three characters contribute to the argument in Crito: Socrates, Crito, and the personification of the Law, whom Socrates introduces as an imaginary character.

Have the students consider the effect of this personification of The Law upon the argument.

Crito by plato socrates argument

(or Plato's) argument for the immortality of the. 4 Texts on Socrates: Plato's Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates, Crito and Aristophanes' Clouds, Revised Edition [Plato, Aristophanes, Thomas G. West, Grace Starry West] on ashio-midori.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Widely adopted for classroom use, this book offers translations of four major works of ancient Greek literature which treat the life and thought of Socrates. Socrates seems quite willing to await his imminent execution, and so Crito presents as many arguments as he can to persuade Socrates to escape.

On a practical level, Socrates' death will reflect badly on his friends--people will think they did nothing to try to save him.

SparkNotes: Crito: Analysis and Themes